Release Date: 1974

Track Listing
1)  Dizzy Dizzy (Can) - 5:40
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2)  Come Sta, La Luna (Can) - 5:44
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3)  Splash (Can) - 7:47
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4)  Chain Reaction (Can) - 11:12
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5)  Quantum Physics (Can) - 8:33
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Member: Son of Nothing
Date: 12/31/2003


Following the masterpiece that was Future Days, Damo Suzuki left Can. A tough job of creating an album that could hold up well to their already strong repertoire lay ahead for the band. Lets see how well they did, shall we?

Throbbing with a quasi-hip-hop beat, "Dizzy Dizzy" announces itself to the world. The one-dimensional violin playing of Michael Karoli and comical synths/key notes of Schmidt add to the sinister nature of the track and Karoli's whispers act as an additional instrument.

"Come Sta, La Luna" begins with reverberations and crow sounds till Schmidt's spaceman-call-for-help "Come Staaa, La Luna aaaa" emanates. The piano runs circles around the primitive Velvet Underground-ish guitar and the funk grooves slowly but brilliantly. This would have blown some minds in those days. Crow sounds end the track finally.

"Splash" begins with Liebezeit hitting those cymbals in a jazzy way until the guitar provides the free-jazz sax noise. It settles in a rhythmic groove with the guitar in the background.

"Chain Reaction" is the longest track on the album and provides ambience/automobile noises for the first 30 seconds. The rhythmic pulses then take over for quite some time. Then a break and a few piano notes and the track slows down. Michael Karoli utters a few unconnected lines "Elephant dominating...Chain Reaction" amidst the returning Velvet Underground-ish guitar. This track alone shows more drumming varieties than most others.

In "Quantum Physics", at first the humming takes form as one of the background rhythms (which is subtle). This piece is an electronic ambient gem and by vibe the second weirdest track after "Come Sta, La Luna". Like any form of madness, this doesn't have a pattern.

For those of you who're Can fans without discovering this severely underrated gem, you're missing out on greatness, which unfortunately can't really be applied to any of its successors. This is THE album to take while embarking on a trip to the moon.



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