Release Date: 1977

Track Listing
1)  Songs from the Wood
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2)  Jack in the Green
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3)  Cup of Wonder
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4)  Hunting Girl
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5)  Ring out Solstice Bells
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6)  Velvet Green
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7)  The Whistler
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8)  Pibroch (Cap in Hand)
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9)  Fires at Midnight
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Member: jethro fish (Profile) (All Album Reviews by jethro fish)
Date: 7/17/2003
Format: CD (Album)

Songs from the wood, released in 1977, is my favorite from JT's so called "folk rock period". Sure, there are plenty of folk influences on this album but many of the progressive elements are there as well.

No one can deny the unbelievable talent that is Ian Anderson. He sings, plays the flute, acoustic guitar, whistles, saxophone (not on this album though), writes all the lyrics, composes all the music, produces the albums etc.. He's also always trying to break new ground within music. Therefore we have seen a lot of different Jethro Tulls over the years. The full out-progressive JT (1971-1976) is without a doubt my favorite era but the folk-progressive era (1977-1979) is a close second.

The rest of the band is flawless in their performance on this album, as usual. I cannot point out enough the incredible talent of drummer Barriemore Barlow and also the often underrated and forgotten guitarist Martin Barre. This is also one of three albums featuring the undeniable bass playing talents of the late John Glascock (RIP).

Favorite tracks from this one is the title track- (majestic), "Velvet green" and the wonderfully folky "The whistler". If you have not yet dared to try the folky-yet proggy side of JT, I urge you to do so. You won't be disappointed.

My rating: 4.5 out of 5
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Member: theJAK (Profile) (All Album Reviews by theJAK)
Date: 9/11/2003
Format: CD (Album)

Even though I think that Jethro Tull in one of the biggest progressive rock bands ever, my first reaction to their albums is always very strange. Maybe because I grew up listening to Pink Floyd and Yes (my father and elder brother are big fans also), only in my late adolescence have I started to hear other kind of Progressive rock like King Crimson, Van den Graaf Generator and Jethro Tull, among others, and realy knowing what prog rock realy means.

So, as I was saying, my first audition of Jetho Tull's albums is always strange and everytime the albums start growing on me by the 3rd or 4th audition.This album "Songs from the wood" was the same. I bought it and listened to him on my way home, and at the first I thought "Well, here's a very polished Aqualung" but then as I started to listen over and over again the album I noticed the Thick as a Brick and Passion Play influences to.

This is a good Tull album, as it combines Ian Anderson's folk influences with great prog rock. Full of great flute, whistles, mandolin and other acoustic instruments the album has a certain medieval fair atmosphere, combined with great drums and bass, kickin' electric guitar and lush keyboards. At the same time you can also hear some great hard rock riffing and specially drumming (Barlow played in some heavy metal bands in the 80's like Yngwie Malmsteen's first album).

Not being a masterpiece, this is a great album, that mixes the folk and progressive rock finelly alongside with some ass-kickin' Hard Rock (I'm also a great metalhead). I would consider "Songs from the wood", "Hunting girl", "The Whistler" and "Pibroch (Cap in Hand)" the best tracks of a overall very good album.

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Member: BIRDY (Profile) (All Album Reviews by BIRDY)
Date: 9/28/2005
Format: CD (Album)

After many tours and best-selling albums, the leader of Jethro Tull, Ian Anderson retreated to his land in the country and emerged victorious with this brilliant album of progressive folk-rock! Every song was filled with references to the land, the woods and the strange and mythical creatures that inhabited them.

This was the style of music that Jethro Tull always played best and that I always hoped that they'd get back to: jangly guitars, flutes, pipe organs, bells, bass, drums and more combined with brilliant lyrics so profound, you could almost smell the moss on "Velvet Green".

This may also have been the height of the band's musicianship as well with glorious harmonies and playing all around. "Hunting Girl" is exciting, "The Whistler" joyous, "Velvet Green" arousing in its' sexuality, "Jack-In-The-Green" a tad spooky and "Fire at Midnight" brings it all back home to the manor with an evening at home with the lady by the fireplace. Surely it didn't get any better than this! Re-mastered with 2 bonus tracks.
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